Unfortunately, he simply selected the word because

Unfortunately, this is the most in-depth explanation ever quoted from Jobs.  To think he simply selected the word because it sounded “fun” and “spirited” is an understatement.  Why did the word apple seem that way to Jobs?  Personally, before the marketing influence of Apple Computers struck me, I never considered the fruit “fun” or “spirited”. It was an item in my lunch box that I usually attempted to trade away for a package of Dunkaroos. Furthermore, if Steve had the chance to read “Apple Evolved Part 1”, he would have understood that Christian culture believes the apple to be the “forbidden fruit” and the bearer of all evil. Not so fun after all, eh? But Steve was an enlightenment seeking Buddhist, not a Christian!  In Buddhist terms, “enlightenment” is defined as the full awakening of a human mind. It is attained when all mental limitations have been removed and one’s positive potential is completely and perfectly realized.  Legend says that only a handful of humans have truly attained enlightenment throughout Buddhism’s 2,500 year history. Steve, nonetheless, was not intimidated by this and it became his main goal before Apple Computers. These were the years when he made use of psychedelics to help dive deeper into his soul and mind… Apparently it helps! Anyway, in an earlier section of Isaacson’s biography, it mentions that after Jobs dropped out of Reed College, he spent his weekends working at an apple orchard in northern California with a few of his “enlightenment seeking” friends. According to Jobs’ friend Robert Friedland, “Steve ran the apple orchard!” (Isaacson 117)  But what happens when you combine pruning apple trees with seeking enlightenment? You get very, very, deep thoughts about the apple – at least I’d hope! We can only imagine what their revelations surrounded but I speculate it was majorly based on the simplicity and pureness of an apple. We can see this in a statement from one of Jobs’ friends in Isaacson’s biography;