Lights questions I had. I’d like to

Lights On or Off?Does flicking a light on and off really use more electricity than leaving it on?Physical ScienceExperimental Investigation___________________________________________Signature of Sponsoring Teacher___________________________________________Signature of School Science Fair Coordinator TeacherNathan Liu640 W. Scott St. Chicago, IL 60610Grade 7Table of ContentsAcknowledgments Page 3Purpose and Hypothesis Page 4Background Research Page 5-6Materials and Procedure Page 7Results Page 8-10 Conclusion, Reflection, Application Page 11-12Reference List Page 13-14Acknowledgments I’d like to acknowledge my parents, and Ms. Machado. This is because Ms. Machado assigned this project to me, and she answered any questions I had. I’d like to acknowledge my parents, because they supported me throughout my experiment, and they helped entertained me during the long periods of waiting. They were also the ones that bought the materials needed for this experiment, and I wouldn’t be able to do it without them.Purpose and Hypothesis The purpose of my experiment was to see how many kilowatts a lamp would use in 4 hours, compared to the amount of kilowatts a lamp would use in 4 hours, but flicked off and on once every 15 minutes. My hypothesis is if I test how many watts a lamp uses when I leave it on, compared to flicking it on and off for 4 hours, the lamp that I flick on and off will use more watts because there is a spark of energy used when turning on a light, and that spark will be enough to make a difference, and ultimately use more kilowatts. I learned this from many different sources, many of them claim that there a slight spark in energy used when turning on a ¬†light, and when I test it for long enough, there will be a major difference. Also, I am flicking the light on and off many times, so the sparks of electricity used will stack up. Review of LiteratureI was trying to figure out if flicking a light on and off really used more electricity than just leaving it on. The first thing I searched for, was if anyone else did that experiment, so I can learn from theirs and make it better. There was indeed one show that did this. The mythbusters tried this out and there were some pretty interesting stuff that I learned. Something really interesting I found was the fact that people should turn off their LED light if they are leaving the room for 1.28 seconds or more. So basically, this means that according to this experiment, it is almost always better to turn off your light when leaving a room. (www.vanderbilt.edu) Next, I tried to find if there was a spark of energy when turning on a light, that was big enough to make a huge difference. Most trustworthy sites said the same exact thing. There is indeed a spark of electricity used when turning on a light, but according to many sources, the spark of electricity is so small, it really doesn’t even make a difference, and it won’t even show up on a watt measurer. Also, studies show that when leaving a room, it’s better to turn off the light if leaving for more than 15 minutes, and leave it on if you’re leaving for less than 15 minutes. That is the general rule for most lights, like CFLS, LEDs, and Incandescent lights.(energy.gov) The mythbusters show says “Yes there is a spike when you flip the switch on but it is in no way significant enough to be considered money saving to leave your lights on for a few minutes while you leave the room. So it is best to turn off your lights even for a few minutes, than to leave them running fearing the spike in energy and a spike in your electricity bill.(Curiousread.com) Also if you were to use energy saving bulbs in the bathroom and were constantly flicking them on and off you would have to replace them sooner and in the end you be paying more for the bulbs than your month’s electric bill.Materials and ProcedureMaterials1 watt measurer (preferably a P4400) 1 Notebook to record data in1 Pencil/Pen1 Lamp1 Power Outlet ProcedureGather/buy all materialsPlug the watt measurer into the wall. (Preferably a P4400 Kill A Watt)Plug your lamp into the watt measurerTurn on the lamp for 4 hours, and write down how many watts it’s used.Unplug the lamp, and replug it in to reset the watt count.Turn on the lamp for 4 hours, but flick it on and off once every 15 minutes. Write down how many watts it’s used.Create tables, graphs, and compare data.Repeat steps 1-7 two more times to get 3 trials.VariablesControlled: How long the lamp is going to be turned on-4 hours. The type of lamp used, with the same light bulb. The power outlet.Independent: On one of the lamps, I would turn it on and off once every 15 minutes, while I keep the other one on.Dependent: The amount of watts used is the dependent variable. ResultsThis graph shows that the amount of kilowatts the lamp used in 4 hours was the same when I flicked it on and off, and when I left it on. This is most likely because the spark of energy used was so small, it didn’t even make a difference big enough to show up on the watt measurer.Trial OneFlickNo FlickKilowatts Used1.61.6This graph shows the same thing as Trial One. It shows that the amount of kilowatts the lamp used in 4 hours was the same when I flicked it on and off, and when I left it on. This is most likely because the spark of energy used was so small, it didn’t even make a difference big enough to show up on the watt measurer. This just proves that trial one was accurateTrial 2FlickNo FlickKilowatts used1.61.6This graph shows the same thing as Trial One. It shows that the amount of kilowatts the lamp used in 4 hours was the same when I flicked it on and off, and when I left it on. This is most likely because the spark of energy used was so small, it didn’t even make a difference big enough to show up on the watt measurer. This just proves that both trial one and two were accurate.Trial 3FlickNo FlickKilowatts Used1.61.6Conclusion, Reflection, and ApplicationMy project was about whether there was a difference between the watts used for a lamp that stayed on, and a lamp that was flicked on and off. I hypothesized that the lamp that was flicked on and off would use more energy, because there is a slight spark is energy when turning on a light. I thought that the spark would be enough to cause a difference so big, it showed on the watt measurer. I tested it by using a watt measurer to measure how many watts the lamp used when flicked on and off every 15 minutes for 4 hours. Then, I measured how many watts the lamp used then left on for 4 hours. I noticed that there was absolutely no difference when it comes to watts used, between the flick and no flick. This proves that my hypothesis was incorrect, because there was no difference in watts used. My test was fair. This is because I used a time for 4 hours on one device, and another for the lamp I flicked on and off. That is how I made sure that I really flicked the light on and off every 15 minutes, and not just once every few minutes, or some weird estimate. The same goes for the no flick test, except I only needed one device. If I were to change anything/do this again, I would use a lot more time. I would probably use 24 hours , and flick the light on and off once every 30 minutes. This is because I feel like 4 hours wasn’t enough to get all of the data I needed. Also, I would probably try leaving the lamp off for another 15 minutes when flicking it on and off, just to make it more realistic. I am curious if my results would be different on other types of lightbulbs. In my research, I learned that only certain light bulbs fall into the 15 minutes rule, (If you leave the room for more than 15 minutes, turn it off, if not, leave it on) so it would be cool if another type of lightbulb had different results as this.This experiment can be used in a real life situation in many ways. First, it can really help people looking to save money on their electricity bill. Parents looking to save on their electricity bill usually tell those who live in their houses, to leave the light on when leaving a room for a short period of time, because the spark of electricity is too much. That theory was just proven wrong by this experiment. This experiment connects to our lives, because electricity is very important in our lives. Without electricity, everything would get messed up, and everything would get set back to the cave man ages. There would be no more plane travel, as they need electricity, and there would be a lot more pollution, because humans would need to rely on non-renewable resources. That just proves why electricity bills are so expensive. It’s really important, and this can help people save thousands of dollars on their electricity bill.Reference ListAdams, C. (2013, September 23). Fluorescent lights: the myth. Retrieved November 21, 2017, from https://www.environment.admin.cam.ac.uk/resources/mythbusters-facts-top-tips/fluorescent-mythDo you turn the lights off when you leave the room? (2016, September 08). Retrieved November 15, 2017, from https://blog.constellation.com/2016/07/12/electricity-conservation-tips-flowchart/How Much Money Can You Save by Turning Off the Lights? (n.d.). Retrieved November 15, 2017, from https://mrelectric.com/blog/turn-off-lights-save-moneyL. (2012, June 19). Should I Turn Off Fluorescent Lights When Leaving a Room? Retrieved November 21, 2017, from https://www.lightingdesignlab.com/resources/articles/articles-lighting-fundamentals/should-i-turn-fluorescent-lights-when-leaving-roomMythBusters Episode 169: Let There Be Light. (n.d.). Retrieved November 21, 2017, from https://mythresults.com/let-there-be-lightMyth Buster: Leave lights on? Or turn them off and back on again? (n.d.). Retrieved November 15, 2017, from http://www.curiousread.com/2007/11/myth-busters-leave-lights-on-or-turn.html#5EUrScdzJfBreevu.99(n.d.). Retrieved November 15, 2017, from https://www.vanderbilt.edu/sustainvu/2006/12/the-discovery-channels-mythbusters-test-the-effects-of-turning-off-the-lights/Should you always turn the lights out when leaving a room? (2016, September 01). Retrieved November 21, 2017, from http://grist.org/living/should-you-always-turn-the-lights-out-when-leaving-a-room/Should you turn lights off when you leave the room? (n.d.). Retrieved November 15, 2017, from https://www.makeitcheaper.com.au/news/should-you-turn-lights-off-when-you-leave-the-roomT., R., & S. (n.d.). Turn off lights when you’re not using them – Efficient Homes. Retrieved November 15, 2017, from http://www.green-energy-efficient-homes.com/turn-off-lights.htmlWhen to Turn Off Your Lights. (n.d.). Retrieved November 15, 2017, from https://energy.gov/energysaver/when-turn-your-lights