It to end Llewelyn Moss runs for

It is hard to tell who the main character is, but I have decided the main character of the story is Llewelyn Moss. Even though he dies two thirds of the way through the book, he is the key that unlocks the whole story. Moss is a white man, in his mid 30’s, a Vietnam war veteran. He was a sniper, and now uses his skills to hunt. He lives in a small home with his wife, and is currently working as a welder. His role in the story begins when he comes across a drug deal gone bad, but more importantly, 2.4 million dollars— which is a lot for 1980. And a bunch of dead drug dealers aren’t going to notice it was gone. Llewelyn knows this will change his life. Moss makes the mistake of going back to give the dying drug dealer water. His mistake puts Anton Chigurh, a ruthless hitman, hot on his trial. He realizes this and tries to escape him, which is what pushes him through the rest of the book until his ultimate demise. He shows that he is a smart and calculated man and plans every step of his journey carefully. Throughout the story, he proves his skill as a veteran soldier. His motivation is to escape Chigurh and bring the money back home. He proves to be a worthy opponent of Chigurh and matches his skills as a soldier/ hitman. From beginning to end Llewelyn Moss runs for his life to try to give himself and his wife a better one.The recurring themes throughout the story are fate, free will, and chance. Free will is shown through Llewelyn Moss’. The book begins with Llewelyn Moss happening upon a drug deal gone wrong. He had no business being there, but by chance he ends up finding 2.4 million dollars. He could have just left the money there and not gotten involved in whatever happened there. But by his own free will he takes the money. Moss maintains to exercise free will, hoping that he can overcome fate, but eventually fails in the end. Moss made choices that influence the course of his life, but no matter what route he chose, life ends in death. The second theme is shown through Anton Chigurh, who is the physical embodiment of fate. In his interactions with the other characters, he constantly shows that every choice we make determines our fate. Even small actions can lead toward death. One example of this is Chigurh’s coin toss, putting the fate of his victims to a 50/50 chance. The coin serves several functions. The coin toss is the connection between the choices we make and their consequent outcomes. The coin represents the presence of chance built in the nature of decision-making. He pulls the coin-toss trick on a cashier at a gas station. Chigurh makes him call the coin, while implying that if he calls wrong, it’ll be the last call he ever makes. Chigurh tells the cashier, “You’ve been putting it up your whole life. You just didn’t know it” (56). He implies that the cashier made a series of decisions in his life that brought him to this exact moment, with his life in the hands of a simple coin toss. During the whole of the book, the themes of fate, free will, and chance were repeated, both through the actions of the characters and the characters themselves.The ideas of No Country for Old Men are timeless, as relevant in today’s society as in any other society. Primarily among them is evil, and the fact that sometimes good people are powerless to stop it. Anton Chigurh is the embodiment of this evil, but Sheriff Bell realizes it, quoting from newspaper articles about murders and expressing his disbelief as to the bloodshed around him. Evil, and the realization that the world is becoming a more evil place, are heavily relevant today. There are other themes that are relevant today as well. People are corrupted by wealth, or blinded by the possibility of acquiring wealth. We see this throughout American society, for example, corporations sell out for big bucks and leave their customers in the dust. In more recent news, the FCC and net neutrality. By repealing it, internet service providers will gain millions of dollars. They are blinded by the fact that their gain causes great losses to all American internet users. I thought the book was amazing, it had me wanting to keep reading. It was a bit confusing at times so it took me a while to figure some parts out. I have seen the movie before and I thought it was really good, so after reading the book it gave me a better understanding of some of the underlying themes.I would recommend this book for next year, I think that students would enjoy this rather than one of the school assigned books, which are always boring.